Today is mainly teapots: photographing ceramics with Fuji X system.

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Clive Bowen is one the U.K’s most renowned and respected potters. He makes earthenware pots made from Devon red clay dug from the banks of the river Taw, thrown and slip decorated before firing them in huge woodfired bottle kilns. Following centuries  old techniques these ceramics are wonderfully utilitarian yet each unique in character, glaze and design. Today Clive is making mainly tea-pots. These are tricky little blighters. They line up on a wooden board, each perfectly thrown, the tiny spout crafted and cut so that it pours correctly and the handle shaped and attached securely, the lid correctly sized and alined.. It takes a lifetime of skill and trust in the material to get these right.  Every stage of studio pottery is crucial: preparing the raw material, throwing the clay, decorating, glazing, stacking the kiln and firing. Each stge frought with hazards and serendipity. But for now I am not going to talk about Clive or pottery; his story is for another day . .. any one who wants to know more can let me know. Instead this post is about photographing ceramics.

Studio Pottery is born of Earth and made from fire. It requires space to breath and to come alive.  The colours glow and glimmer.  Of course I could take these shots in a studio environment with back lights and strobes, umbrellas and stands and get sharp crisp images but for me the life of the pot, of the craft and skill that goes into it’s making, the energy of the piece would be lost.

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As you photographers know taking images of shiny things or surfaces is a nightmare. Every light source is reflected off the surface.  So I never use flash or soft box but stick with natural light,  North Facing if possible. I have tried back lighting but this just makes the image look naf and dumbs down frame centre where you actually want to show case the pot or cluster. On my Fuji XF 35mm lens I use a polarising filter, which sometimes helps to avoid blown out light hot-spots. I am not necessarily interested in the finest detail as these shots are not going to pixel peeped or printed to huge size. What I do need though for product photos,  is consistency.  Therein lies a difficulty when every pot is different, depth of glaze,  colour from dark to light, shininess, form and shape. To overcome this I shoot in jpeg mode not raw, this is because the Fuji film simulation modes are so reliable I know my colours will  be matched whenever I am shooting. I use velvia for a standard look. Classic chrome is my favourite, but not for ceramics. Similarly I find it easier to use auto. white balance rather than use a grey card.  I keep an eye on iso when shooting but don’t mind if it creeps up. Fuji jpeg noise at high iso can give a grain like look which again does not necessarily detract from my final image.

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Today I am photographing new work by Clive for a flyer to advertise an exhibition in Japan. His pots are being shown alongside  ceramics by Bernard Leach and other well known potters.  It’s early morning, for a few moments the sun is out. I have set up a super large jar with a couple of jugs alongside for scale. Stopped down to f5.6 so as to get some depth of field. [Wide open on the XF35 1.4 means half the pot will be out of focus] I take a couple of shots, Blimey! the lens is hunting like crazy for focus, light is reflecting off every surface. Grr! who wants sun?  I always take back-up images of every pot or cluster with a second camera. Today I use the original X100. The filmic quality of it’s sensor is still brilliant,  sometimes it is the only camera I ever need. Sure. the trusty little beast nails focus immediately, captures the shot where the 35mm couldn’t.  I move everything into the kiln area, where it is almost dark, light source.. one open door. Even here I underexpose by one stop, givening me better depth of colour and detail in darker areas on processing.  On blown areas I huff on the pot,  slide back about six feet and dash off the shot.  Breath on pot again.. repeat.  Some folk I understand rub soap or some other gunge on the ceramic to dull it down. That doesn’t work for me because the final image comes out flat and lifeless. My quick blast of warm breath takes the shine off for just long enough.

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I have to take a couple of shots of Clive in the workshop. There is strip, natural and tungsten lighting from all over the place. I turn everything off and just use light from the window which is covered by a lovely film of red clay dust. No room in this dynamic, creative area for a tripod so everything is handheld. For those who are interested my settings are as follows: sharpness plus 1, colour neutral zero, shadows and highlights neutral, auto ISO with shutter speed set at 80 slowest, dynamic range 200. I use single focus mode with the focus point set centrally to about middle size. The smallest setting is just too small for reliable focus on a glossy ceramic surface. Photometry is set to area mode. The XF 35mm wide open fairs much better in this environment.  The XF 60mm just about manages but ISO is sky high and noise is unacceptable.  I use the X100 and the 23mm slightly wider angle works very well for shots which include both Clive and his work area. Nice light on his face hands and the dark clay. I am done and out of here.

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Processing is done in Lightroom 6. I know these Earth colours by heart, green and gold, brown and ochre, and with the Fuji jpegs I only need to tidy up with some levels and a little crop here and there. I rarely add clarity, or luminence but sometimes lighten shadows and darken highlights.  I complete the edit with a little darken vignette.

 

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Ceramic product shots with Fuji X Series

A couple of days ago I undertook a new shoot for Clive Bowen, one of the U.K’s most respected Potters.  Clive’s wonderful ceramics are made from local North Devon red clay, thrown, decorated and wood-fired in a huge traditional bottle kiln. The resulting pots exemplify  the materials they are made from, with deep earthy green, gold and black  tones and floating etherial trails of slip.  Studio pottery was essentially born from utilitarian table ware. Objects to contain food or liquid,  to store or eat food from. So here are some of  the images which are intended to celebrate both the ceramics and the food.

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Fuji X Pro 1 with XF 35mm 1.4

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Raspberries, Devon clotted cream with pie, on slipware dish

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Fuji XE2 with XF 60mm

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Lunch in the studio [Fuji X 100 series] 

 

Coast versus Mountain: a fujifilm Quest.

For we coastal dwellers mountains are austere, cold and forbidding places that block out light and have no familiar rythm. I live overlooking the Atlantic ocean. Here, our life is bounded by horizon, tides,  and sunsets. We see giant storms come through and watch wonderful and wierd cloud formations. We get lonely and lost away from the sea.

But I know for others it is different. You see mountains in their cool isolation as wondrous and mystical, you play on them,  climb them, and ski their icy sides.

As photographers we choose to take images of what we love best. Recently travelling over the Alps we stopped and gazed in awe at lofty crags. But for me I was not content until I saw, at last,  a glimpse of the sparkling Mediterranean. So there it is.   You Fuji lovers take the best images with the best cameras. Let us have more Mountains and more Ocean.

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FujiX Pro 1 with XF60mm

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Storm gathering at Instow

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a busy day at westward Ho!

Gallery Le Fey profile by The Photographer Society

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Gallery le Fey:
thephotographerssociety:
PHOTOGRAPHER FOCUS · Drew De Rett (Gallery Le Fey)
http://gallerylefey.tumblr.com/
Drew De Rett is primarily a great landscape photographer. He defines himself as a rural photographer, determined to capture the views, reliefs and environments that surround him on the Atlantic coast of England. Photographing the sea, its changes and light, the coastal scenery… is a constant for him, who considers himself as someone alien to street photography, even if, occasionally he intends some explorations in that field.. Probably, in these occasions in which Drew photographs the beaches, that clouds announcing the imminent storm, the shines and lighting effects in the waters of the sea, or the way in which the setting sun draws its deep shadows on the coasts … is when we are in the presence of his most characteristic photography. Even on that many occasions in which the sea does not appear explicitly in his snapshots its presence is somehow sensed. Maybe it’s the light, the colors or the environment, but however the sea ‘is’ there …. it can almost be smelled!

 

 

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There are two cardinal points around which turns his landscape photography. The first is undoubtedly the light. This is a first-order expressive element in Drew’s photographs. Even in those snapshots in which is weak or pale, light assumes the expressive weight of the shot, although its presence can be only measured in subtle reflections or glitters, in faint sparkles that make their way through cloud laden skies, or between the long shadows and backlights that are drawn on clear sunsets. Drew’s work with light is always superb but is in these photographs in which we notice how masterfully he exposes,  assuming with ease the challenge of capturing faithfully atmospheres, colors and textures, even in foggy environments. Of course, in this desire to understand, to model the light that makes its way through his lens, Drew seems to feel equally comfortable when natural light is direct, even tough. Then his photographs captivate by the brightness and saturation of the colors, the way in which the sun highlights the textures of different materials, for its backlights…. The exposure here is again capital to get the right balance between light and shade, along with a perfect control of aperture from which Drew takes advantage to offer us captures characterized by its great depth of field. And beyond his landscape photography, this wonderful obsession for light that affects Drew becomes really apparent when we contemplate his portraits, the indoor photography, the architectures, his still life shots or his abstracts, these snapshots in which, through a creative approach he invites us to look with different eyes and out of its immediate context,  things of unexpected beauty. In all of them is difficult to avoid the impression that the subject is a mere pretext to press the shutter; that is the light – and I mean here the natural light, since Drew does not use flash-, its nuances, the way in which he brings to life the textures and materials, which really moved him  at the time of taking the shot. Do not miss the captures published in his blog chosen among that make up the series dedicated to the wonderful potter Clive Bowen. They’re a great example, of what I tell you

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The other axis around which revolves his magnificent landscape photography and generally all his work, is the composition. Probably there are few concepts in photography that are, at once, so basic and yet so difficult to master. This is because beyond the pure visual interest and the harmony that the composition may bring to an image, we should not forget that on it depends the way in which the photographer explains that fragment of reality that he wants to capture and the mechanisms that lead our attention to the essential element of a given photograph. And contemplating Drew’s work  it is really impossible not to notice the great care and thought underlying behind the composition of each of his photographs. Regarding this issue, Drew assured me having read somewhere that good composition is better than bad cropping, and  it’s evident that he applies systematically this maxim, though I am not referring only to something as prosaic as a reasonable application of the rule of thirds, the dynamic use of lines or the way in which negative space can be distributed as a way to properly highlight what attracted the attention of the  photographer -that also!-.  Beyond manual rules, composing involves to find in the elements of the image that balance, or a harmony so absurdly difficult to explain in words as evident in itself when viewing a photo spatially well built. Naturally, this requires a certain calm and reflection previous to the act of capturing, to certify that the photographic process as such has begun long before pressing the camera shutter. And in Drew’s work will find many examples of that this has been that way.

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Drew uses a Fuji XE2 and Fuji XF35mm 1.4mm lens plus forty year old legacy manual focus lenses and a compact Fuji X100 of whose quality he feels particularly satisfied. Years ago he enjoyed a classic Olympus OM1, period from which  he retains his love for the film that shoots in the lovely little Kodak Retinette, made in Germany. The care and thoroughness with which he plans and makes his photographs are equally extended  to its processing, to which he attaches great importance as a means to bring out the best possible detail and color from each shot. To do this he usually uses Lightroom 6 and Snapseed for snapshots made with iPad and iPhone.
-Juan Manuel
Thanks so much to The Photographer Society for this wonderful article and to Juan Manuel for his perceptive and thoughtful writing.  Drew

Cropping images: how far should you go?

There is a long established argument that it is better to use the full frame image rather than crop.  This means initial composition and subject framing has to be very accurate . Sometimes though, it is just not possible to get in close enough or step back far enough to grab the image you see in your mind.  Here we see a shot taken using the brilliant Fuji XF 35mm lens.

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And here is the shot I saw in my minds eye.

working from home

working from home