Believe in film: Leica M2 versus Olympus mju. for street.

Recently I have been eying up a very nice looking Leica M2 with an old Elmar collapsable to get back into some analogue street photography. Total cost for this little outfit is a tad under £1000, hence a degree of hesitation on my part, especially as I believed after a while I may need the rangefinder re-calibrated to the lens, likely costing another hundred quid ! Ah.! Then I thought maybe a point and shoot, umm, the Contax G2 looked sweet too, with gorgeous Zeiss lenses but also priced very highly now. Instead I opted for an Olympus mju f3.5,  costing just £3 in a charity shop. It looked clean, led display worked, battery still in place and showing charge. Add a roll of Agfa colour 200 asa 24 exposure film purchased from Poundland for [you guessed] one £1.

The little mju is a joy to use, slips easily into a pocket and is ready to use instantly by pushing the neat clamshell lens cover open. There is a satisfying shutter button which allows focus and exposure setting with a half press so you can re-compose if required.  Focus and metering seems more or less instant and then a little whizz as the film advances automatically to the next frame. The flash is constantly alert waiting for low light and fires automatically.  there is a tiny button to switch it off or to use fill flash and another tiny button for self timer. Aside from this there are absolutely no other controls so any form of creative or manual photography is impossible.

For street photography it is brilliant. Slide it out of a pocket while sliding off the lens cover hold up to eye the sweet little viewfinder, compose,  shoot.. three seconds, I reckon.  I tried firing from the hip which was quite successful too.  I bunged the roll into Boots, and opted for one hour processing. From a roll of 24 I achieved 22 exposures, two were spoiled because I thought the film had re-wound when in fact it hadn’t. My mistake, if I had looked at the lcd counter it would have told me as the motor wound back the frames. A couple of shots were blurred again my fault for trying to shoot without the flash,  in low light so an element of camera shake.  The others were pretty good, perfectly well exposed and reasonably sharp and contrasty.  Total cost including camera, film and printing. £11.50

Well, now for the comparison. Leaving aside the camera purchase could I have used the Leica M2 as easily? For a start it is larger and heavier, no metering and I would have to focus every shot. I am happy with zone focussing so this would not be too much of a problem. Here is a fabulous article about metering for film by Johnny Patience well worth applying. The Olympus reads dx film code and this means there is no way to override the ASA/ISO setting, unless you scrape off the black squares on the film canister, so unfortunately I was unable to over-expose by one stop as Johnny suggests. So with my Leica I could have set my own parameters, including ISO, managed shutter speed and aperture and thus bokah. I could happily have applied the sunny sixteenth rule or used pocket light meter on the iphone, but given that I was walking around in sunlight and shade this would have been a little tedious.  OK,  I agree there is no real comparison and undoubtedly given more control and the lovely Leics lens I would have [possibly] ended up with better images. So I will leave it for you to judge. Here are some of the photos I took scanned in with a £40 all in one printer.

Being a strictly FujiFilm digital shooter I am a big fan of Kevin Mullins official Fuji X photographer.  So I kind of like the saturated colour and contrasty shadows that my Olympus mju achieved.  What is more, if I didn’t like this little monkey so much, I could sell it on ebay as a genuinely film tested camera and give the excess profits back to the charity shop.

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Fuji Jpegs versus Kodak Gold 25 years on.

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25 years ago on Sanibel Island, Florida I took some fashion images. A few days ago I caught up with the lovely model, Barley, and sugested we re-create one of the shots.  So here is is on a dull day with our U.K. yellow sand, shot with Fuji X Pro 1 and XF35 1.4 lens.  Well, I did my best but Kodak Gold sure has a great look ..

 

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Analogue versus Digital: the believe in film syndrome.

The tail end of the fifties we had the Everly Brothers, Bill Haley, Elvis and Buddy. Then the sixties. The first album I ever bought was the Rolling Stones, then the Animals. I loved jazz, and Ray Charles and Dave Brubeck. I loved Dusty and Dylan, then I loved Joni and James Taylor. I saw Neil Young play Wembley and I saw Jethro Tull, Deep Purple and Yes. Never saw Bowie or Nina Simone much to my chagrin. Yep, I dug Punk and John Peel too, Oh, and Peggy Lee and Soul and Blues.  I photographed a girl sitting in sunlight and later, married her.

Stay with me .. You will soon understand where this is going..

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During the early seventies I worked in a very posh hifi shop. Our sole aim was to perfect the sound experience. Customers spent literally thousands of pounds searching for high fidelity, the best deck, the least hum and hiss the best suppression, the biggest woofer, or the lightest stylus. We craved this impossible perfection, dreamed music, had albums lining our walls, dusted them lovingly wiped them clean, double wrapped them when putting them away, played them and cursed the crackle and pop of analogue recordings, compared tape and stereo, dolby and four way sound.

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We loathed cassettes but played them in our cars because although they sounded crap compared to 8 track they were smaller and worked better. Anyway my 8 track caught fire in my Ford Cortina mk 2.

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Through the Seventies we surfed and danced and traveled a little. I forget the Eighties, think music was boring,  anyway,  my family was growing up.

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The nineties brought cd,s blimey, they were neat.  They sounded tinny compared to my old albums and not so warm, but they didn’t scratch much. Anyway what is hifi when you listen to music in the kitchen? Screw it , I embraced digital, chucked out my Yashica slr, downloaded or ripped all my albums to mp3 bunged them on an ipod and never looked back..

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And so with photography. This nostalgia for film is reciprocated in the resurgence of pressed plastic albums. Maybe I am being controversial but can’t we now re-create digitally pretty much every film emulsion ever used.? Every Photographic web site or blog I follow and there are loads of them , is offering realistic film simulations or analogue looking presets.  Some of the images here were taken years ago and some taken yesterday, with one or other of my Fuji X series cameras.  Without cheating and looking at the Exif data,  can you tell?

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All social media offer their own brand of clever filters that add grain and scratches to age the image. One of the reasons I Stick with FujiFilm is because their filmic jpgs look so great. Sure, like so many of you, I developed and printed my own negatives, burned, cropped, cut, pushed and experimented, in fact just like I do now in Lightroom. But when I contemplate this wonderful digital world we live in, I don’t really get that we view the images we say we love made on film with obsolete ( yet still fabulous ) cameras, on a screen! This means the image has been scanned, ok so it might look like an analogue photo. But essentially it has been rendered into binary code, like everything else we see online on our Macs and PCs.

I still love music, I still love my wife.

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I still love photography and still believe in film.  But I do love digital too!