In between sets with Soul Intention and FujiXE2

So half way through Soul Intention gig last night I asked to take some photos of the band. With two hundred rockers and jivers surrounding us, five Saxophones on stands, drums, trumpets and guitars everywhere, it was too good a chance to miss. When there are flashing red and green overhead lights, reflections off everything, shadows and darkness everywhere else you know any image taking is going to be tough. And the band members, hot and pumping adrenaline, get them to sit still or even sit down is going to be tricky. Armed with the tiny Fuji XE2 fitted with the XF35mm 1.4 lens you kind of hope that you will be able to cut through all the problems and get a half way decent shot. These are jpeg images, taken wide open, with auto ISO and minimum shutter speed 80, processed in Lightroom 6.

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Today is mainly teapots: photographing ceramics with Fuji X system.

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Clive Bowen is one the U.K’s most renowned and respected potters. He makes earthenware pots made from Devon red clay dug from the banks of the river Taw, thrown and slip decorated before firing them in huge woodfired bottle kilns. Following centuries  old techniques these ceramics are wonderfully utilitarian yet each unique in character, glaze and design. Today Clive is making mainly tea-pots. These are tricky little blighters. They line up on a wooden board, each perfectly thrown, the tiny spout crafted and cut so that it pours correctly and the handle shaped and attached securely, the lid correctly sized and alined.. It takes a lifetime of skill and trust in the material to get these right.  Every stage of studio pottery is crucial: preparing the raw material, throwing the clay, decorating, glazing, stacking the kiln and firing. Each stge frought with hazards and serendipity. But for now I am not going to talk about Clive or pottery; his story is for another day . .. any one who wants to know more can let me know. Instead this post is about photographing ceramics.

Studio Pottery is born of Earth and made from fire. It requires space to breath and to come alive.  The colours glow and glimmer.  Of course I could take these shots in a studio environment with back lights and strobes, umbrellas and stands and get sharp crisp images but for me the life of the pot, of the craft and skill that goes into it’s making, the energy of the piece would be lost.

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As you photographers know taking images of shiny things or surfaces is a nightmare. Every light source is reflected off the surface.  So I never use flash or soft box but stick with natural light,  North Facing if possible. I have tried back lighting but this just makes the image look naf and dumbs down frame centre where you actually want to show case the pot or cluster. On my Fuji XF 35mm lens I use a polarising filter, which sometimes helps to avoid blown out light hot-spots. I am not necessarily interested in the finest detail as these shots are not going to pixel peeped or printed to huge size. What I do need though for product photos,  is consistency.  Therein lies a difficulty when every pot is different, depth of glaze,  colour from dark to light, shininess, form and shape. To overcome this I shoot in jpeg mode not raw, this is because the Fuji film simulation modes are so reliable I know my colours will  be matched whenever I am shooting. I use velvia for a standard look. Classic chrome is my favourite, but not for ceramics. Similarly I find it easier to use auto. white balance rather than use a grey card.  I keep an eye on iso when shooting but don’t mind if it creeps up. Fuji jpeg noise at high iso can give a grain like look which again does not necessarily detract from my final image.

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Today I am photographing new work by Clive for a flyer to advertise an exhibition in Japan. His pots are being shown alongside  ceramics by Bernard Leach and other well known potters.  It’s early morning, for a few moments the sun is out. I have set up a super large jar with a couple of jugs alongside for scale. Stopped down to f5.6 so as to get some depth of field. [Wide open on the XF35 1.4 means half the pot will be out of focus] I take a couple of shots, Blimey! the lens is hunting like crazy for focus, light is reflecting off every surface. Grr! who wants sun?  I always take back-up images of every pot or cluster with a second camera. Today I use the original X100. The filmic quality of it’s sensor is still brilliant,  sometimes it is the only camera I ever need. Sure. the trusty little beast nails focus immediately, captures the shot where the 35mm couldn’t.  I move everything into the kiln area, where it is almost dark, light source.. one open door. Even here I underexpose by one stop, givening me better depth of colour and detail in darker areas on processing.  On blown areas I huff on the pot,  slide back about six feet and dash off the shot.  Breath on pot again.. repeat.  Some folk I understand rub soap or some other gunge on the ceramic to dull it down. That doesn’t work for me because the final image comes out flat and lifeless. My quick blast of warm breath takes the shine off for just long enough.

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I have to take a couple of shots of Clive in the workshop. There is strip, natural and tungsten lighting from all over the place. I turn everything off and just use light from the window which is covered by a lovely film of red clay dust. No room in this dynamic, creative area for a tripod so everything is handheld. For those who are interested my settings are as follows: sharpness plus 1, colour neutral zero, shadows and highlights neutral, auto ISO with shutter speed set at 80 slowest, dynamic range 200. I use single focus mode with the focus point set centrally to about middle size. The smallest setting is just too small for reliable focus on a glossy ceramic surface. Photometry is set to area mode. The XF 35mm wide open fairs much better in this environment.  The XF 60mm just about manages but ISO is sky high and noise is unacceptable.  I use the X100 and the 23mm slightly wider angle works very well for shots which include both Clive and his work area. Nice light on his face hands and the dark clay. I am done and out of here.

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Processing is done in Lightroom 6. I know these Earth colours by heart, green and gold, brown and ochre, and with the Fuji jpegs I only need to tidy up with some levels and a little crop here and there. I rarely add clarity, or luminence but sometimes lighten shadows and darken highlights.  I complete the edit with a little darken vignette.

 

Back to my Fuji roots: coast and landscape

Overlooking the wild Atlantic coast it is never easy to forget the savage beauty of the ocean or the calm sunset of a still day.

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For a while I have been focussing on other photography projects but this evening I slung the lovely old Fuji Xpro 1 over my shoulder with XF18mm attached and set off along the sand.  Dusk comes slowly here in North Devon.  The light hangs in the air,  there is a glow,  cast from the sand and the sea, reflections of gold and blue.  Today not a cloud in the sky, a faint mist already drifting across the sand-hills,  everything calm. Around me feeding on the shoreline, Oystercatchers and Egrets, Sandpipers and Sanderlings. The haunting cry of the Curlew echoes across the River Taw.  Sometimes it is awe inspiring, sometimes you have to look out and look up, how can this magic be here for me,  yet others, far away suffer oppression and tyranny?  So for today I whisper a quiet thank you.

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Believe in film: Leica M2 versus Olympus mju. for street.

Recently I have been eying up a very nice looking Leica M2 with an old Elmar collapsable to get back into some analogue street photography. Total cost for this little outfit is a tad under £1000, hence a degree of hesitation on my part, especially as I believed after a while I may need the rangefinder re-calibrated to the lens, likely costing another hundred quid ! Ah.! Then I thought maybe a point and shoot, umm, the Contax G2 looked sweet too, with gorgeous Zeiss lenses but also priced very highly now. Instead I opted for an Olympus mju f3.5,  costing just £3 in a charity shop. It looked clean, led display worked, battery still in place and showing charge. Add a roll of Agfa colour 200 asa 24 exposure film purchased from Poundland for [you guessed] one £1.

The little mju is a joy to use, slips easily into a pocket and is ready to use instantly by pushing the neat clamshell lens cover open. There is a satisfying shutter button which allows focus and exposure setting with a half press so you can re-compose if required.  Focus and metering seems more or less instant and then a little whizz as the film advances automatically to the next frame. The flash is constantly alert waiting for low light and fires automatically.  there is a tiny button to switch it off or to use fill flash and another tiny button for self timer. Aside from this there are absolutely no other controls so any form of creative or manual photography is impossible.

For street photography it is brilliant. Slide it out of a pocket while sliding off the lens cover hold up to eye the sweet little viewfinder, compose,  shoot.. three seconds, I reckon.  I tried firing from the hip which was quite successful too.  I bunged the roll into Boots, and opted for one hour processing. From a roll of 24 I achieved 22 exposures, two were spoiled because I thought the film had re-wound when in fact it hadn’t. My mistake, if I had looked at the lcd counter it would have told me as the motor wound back the frames. A couple of shots were blurred again my fault for trying to shoot without the flash,  in low light so an element of camera shake.  The others were pretty good, perfectly well exposed and reasonably sharp and contrasty.  Total cost including camera, film and printing. £11.50

Well, now for the comparison. Leaving aside the camera purchase could I have used the Leica M2 as easily? For a start it is larger and heavier, no metering and I would have to focus every shot. I am happy with zone focussing so this would not be too much of a problem. Here is a fabulous article about metering for film by Johnny Patience well worth applying. The Olympus reads dx film code and this means there is no way to override the ASA/ISO setting, unless you scrape off the black squares on the film canister, so unfortunately I was unable to over-expose by one stop as Johnny suggests. So with my Leica I could have set my own parameters, including ISO, managed shutter speed and aperture and thus bokah. I could happily have applied the sunny sixteenth rule or used pocket light meter on the iphone, but given that I was walking around in sunlight and shade this would have been a little tedious.  OK,  I agree there is no real comparison and undoubtedly given more control and the lovely Leics lens I would have [possibly] ended up with better images. So I will leave it for you to judge. Here are some of the photos I took scanned in with a £40 all in one printer.

Being a strictly FujiFilm digital shooter I am a big fan of Kevin Mullins official Fuji X photographer.  So I kind of like the saturated colour and contrasty shadows that my Olympus mju achieved.  What is more, if I didn’t like this little monkey so much, I could sell it on ebay as a genuinely film tested camera and give the excess profits back to the charity shop.

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Ceramic product shots with Fuji X Series

A couple of days ago I undertook a new shoot for Clive Bowen, one of the U.K’s most respected Potters.  Clive’s wonderful ceramics are made from local North Devon red clay, thrown, decorated and wood-fired in a huge traditional bottle kiln. The resulting pots exemplify  the materials they are made from, with deep earthy green, gold and black  tones and floating etherial trails of slip.  Studio pottery was essentially born from utilitarian table ware. Objects to contain food or liquid,  to store or eat food from. So here are some of  the images which are intended to celebrate both the ceramics and the food.

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Fuji X Pro 1 with XF 35mm 1.4

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Raspberries, Devon clotted cream with pie, on slipware dish

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Fuji XE2 with XF 60mm

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Lunch in the studio [Fuji X 100 series] 

 

Analogue versus Digital: the believe in film syndrome.

The tail end of the fifties we had the Everly Brothers, Bill Haley, Elvis and Buddy. Then the sixties. The first album I ever bought was the Rolling Stones, then the Animals. I loved jazz, and Ray Charles and Dave Brubeck. I loved Dusty and Dylan, then I loved Joni and James Taylor. I saw Neil Young play Wembley and I saw Jethro Tull, Deep Purple and Yes. Never saw Bowie or Nina Simone much to my chagrin. Yep, I dug Punk and John Peel too, Oh, and Peggy Lee and Soul and Blues.  I photographed a girl sitting in sunlight and later, married her.

Stay with me .. You will soon understand where this is going..

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During the early seventies I worked in a very posh hifi shop. Our sole aim was to perfect the sound experience. Customers spent literally thousands of pounds searching for high fidelity, the best deck, the least hum and hiss the best suppression, the biggest woofer, or the lightest stylus. We craved this impossible perfection, dreamed music, had albums lining our walls, dusted them lovingly wiped them clean, double wrapped them when putting them away, played them and cursed the crackle and pop of analogue recordings, compared tape and stereo, dolby and four way sound.

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We loathed cassettes but played them in our cars because although they sounded crap compared to 8 track they were smaller and worked better. Anyway my 8 track caught fire in my Ford Cortina mk 2.

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Through the Seventies we surfed and danced and traveled a little. I forget the Eighties, think music was boring,  anyway,  my family was growing up.

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The nineties brought cd,s blimey, they were neat.  They sounded tinny compared to my old albums and not so warm, but they didn’t scratch much. Anyway what is hifi when you listen to music in the kitchen? Screw it , I embraced digital, chucked out my Yashica slr, downloaded or ripped all my albums to mp3 bunged them on an ipod and never looked back..

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And so with photography. This nostalgia for film is reciprocated in the resurgence of pressed plastic albums. Maybe I am being controversial but can’t we now re-create digitally pretty much every film emulsion ever used.? Every Photographic web site or blog I follow and there are loads of them , is offering realistic film simulations or analogue looking presets.  Some of the images here were taken years ago and some taken yesterday, with one or other of my Fuji X series cameras.  Without cheating and looking at the Exif data,  can you tell?

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All social media offer their own brand of clever filters that add grain and scratches to age the image. One of the reasons I Stick with FujiFilm is because their filmic jpgs look so great. Sure, like so many of you, I developed and printed my own negatives, burned, cropped, cut, pushed and experimented, in fact just like I do now in Lightroom. But when I contemplate this wonderful digital world we live in, I don’t really get that we view the images we say we love made on film with obsolete ( yet still fabulous ) cameras, on a screen! This means the image has been scanned, ok so it might look like an analogue photo. But essentially it has been rendered into binary code, like everything else we see online on our Macs and PCs.

I still love music, I still love my wife.

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I still love photography and still believe in film.  But I do love digital too!