Snow Buntings, Crow Point and the Fuji XPro 1

A few Snow Buntings have made the onerous journey from the Arctic to Crow Point, North Devon.  Today there was a harsh frost, temperature minus four, so they may have wondered why bother?  Nevertheless a brilliant clear,  bright morning, with wraiths of mist gently rising off the River Taw and Torridge estuary and frost lying white, coating the dunes with tiny ice crystals.  Then typical of this Biosphere in a few moments,  a sharp,  freezing wind kicked up and the landscape changed from blue to grey as a heavy mist rolled in from the sea.  The surf, at low tide, some half a mile away.. invisible, yet still heard,  loud, Atlantic waves, at least ten degrees warmer than the air, the cause of this pea souper. Out of the gloom, random and abstract, a runner, miles from any where..

 

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Then we saw the Snow Buntings, squat, fat little creatures, hunched against the cold, feeding on frozen seed heads in the short Burrows grass. Flitting suddenly to another station, a flash of white and they are gone.

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Soul Intention: Funky South West Soul band

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The Pier House at Westward Ho! last night was rocking to the sounds of funky new band Soul Intention.

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Chris, the raunchy male lead vocalist piled it on and Terry, lead female vocals wowed the audience with sublime soul oldies.

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Soul Intention has  an eleven member line up of experienced  and professional musicians who have come together under the stewardship of Trevor Davis who lays down the bass line.

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A five piece horn section keeps the groove running while Tom lets rip on lead guitar. Drums and keyboards compliment the ensemble.

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Superb arrangements by Tony Oreshko..   Never stop dancing ..  the audience could not get enough.

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The event organised by Bideford Lions Club helped to raise funds for the wonderful Children’s Hospice South West .. with thanks to Braddicks Holiday Centre, Westward Ho! for providing the venue.

Coast versus Mountain: a fujifilm Quest.

For we coastal dwellers mountains are austere, cold and forbidding places that block out light and have no familiar rythm. I live overlooking the Atlantic ocean. Here, our life is bounded by horizon, tides,  and sunsets. We see giant storms come through and watch wonderful and wierd cloud formations. We get lonely and lost away from the sea.

But I know for others it is different. You see mountains in their cool isolation as wondrous and mystical, you play on them,  climb them, and ski their icy sides.

As photographers we choose to take images of what we love best. Recently travelling over the Alps we stopped and gazed in awe at lofty crags. But for me I was not content until I saw, at last,  a glimpse of the sparkling Mediterranean. So there it is.   You Fuji lovers take the best images with the best cameras. Let us have more Mountains and more Ocean.

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FujiX Pro 1 with XF60mm

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Storm gathering at Instow

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a busy day at westward Ho!

Gallery Le Fey profile by The Photographer Society

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Gallery le Fey:
thephotographerssociety:
PHOTOGRAPHER FOCUS · Drew De Rett (Gallery Le Fey)
http://gallerylefey.tumblr.com/
Drew De Rett is primarily a great landscape photographer. He defines himself as a rural photographer, determined to capture the views, reliefs and environments that surround him on the Atlantic coast of England. Photographing the sea, its changes and light, the coastal scenery… is a constant for him, who considers himself as someone alien to street photography, even if, occasionally he intends some explorations in that field.. Probably, in these occasions in which Drew photographs the beaches, that clouds announcing the imminent storm, the shines and lighting effects in the waters of the sea, or the way in which the setting sun draws its deep shadows on the coasts … is when we are in the presence of his most characteristic photography. Even on that many occasions in which the sea does not appear explicitly in his snapshots its presence is somehow sensed. Maybe it’s the light, the colors or the environment, but however the sea ‘is’ there …. it can almost be smelled!

 

 

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There are two cardinal points around which turns his landscape photography. The first is undoubtedly the light. This is a first-order expressive element in Drew’s photographs. Even in those snapshots in which is weak or pale, light assumes the expressive weight of the shot, although its presence can be only measured in subtle reflections or glitters, in faint sparkles that make their way through cloud laden skies, or between the long shadows and backlights that are drawn on clear sunsets. Drew’s work with light is always superb but is in these photographs in which we notice how masterfully he exposes,  assuming with ease the challenge of capturing faithfully atmospheres, colors and textures, even in foggy environments. Of course, in this desire to understand, to model the light that makes its way through his lens, Drew seems to feel equally comfortable when natural light is direct, even tough. Then his photographs captivate by the brightness and saturation of the colors, the way in which the sun highlights the textures of different materials, for its backlights…. The exposure here is again capital to get the right balance between light and shade, along with a perfect control of aperture from which Drew takes advantage to offer us captures characterized by its great depth of field. And beyond his landscape photography, this wonderful obsession for light that affects Drew becomes really apparent when we contemplate his portraits, the indoor photography, the architectures, his still life shots or his abstracts, these snapshots in which, through a creative approach he invites us to look with different eyes and out of its immediate context,  things of unexpected beauty. In all of them is difficult to avoid the impression that the subject is a mere pretext to press the shutter; that is the light – and I mean here the natural light, since Drew does not use flash-, its nuances, the way in which he brings to life the textures and materials, which really moved him  at the time of taking the shot. Do not miss the captures published in his blog chosen among that make up the series dedicated to the wonderful potter Clive Bowen. They’re a great example, of what I tell you

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The other axis around which revolves his magnificent landscape photography and generally all his work, is the composition. Probably there are few concepts in photography that are, at once, so basic and yet so difficult to master. This is because beyond the pure visual interest and the harmony that the composition may bring to an image, we should not forget that on it depends the way in which the photographer explains that fragment of reality that he wants to capture and the mechanisms that lead our attention to the essential element of a given photograph. And contemplating Drew’s work  it is really impossible not to notice the great care and thought underlying behind the composition of each of his photographs. Regarding this issue, Drew assured me having read somewhere that good composition is better than bad cropping, and  it’s evident that he applies systematically this maxim, though I am not referring only to something as prosaic as a reasonable application of the rule of thirds, the dynamic use of lines or the way in which negative space can be distributed as a way to properly highlight what attracted the attention of the  photographer -that also!-.  Beyond manual rules, composing involves to find in the elements of the image that balance, or a harmony so absurdly difficult to explain in words as evident in itself when viewing a photo spatially well built. Naturally, this requires a certain calm and reflection previous to the act of capturing, to certify that the photographic process as such has begun long before pressing the camera shutter. And in Drew’s work will find many examples of that this has been that way.

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Drew uses a Fuji XE2 and Fuji XF35mm 1.4mm lens plus forty year old legacy manual focus lenses and a compact Fuji X100 of whose quality he feels particularly satisfied. Years ago he enjoyed a classic Olympus OM1, period from which  he retains his love for the film that shoots in the lovely little Kodak Retinette, made in Germany. The care and thoroughness with which he plans and makes his photographs are equally extended  to its processing, to which he attaches great importance as a means to bring out the best possible detail and color from each shot. To do this he usually uses Lightroom 6 and Snapseed for snapshots made with iPad and iPhone.
-Juan Manuel
Thanks so much to The Photographer Society for this wonderful article and to Juan Manuel for his perceptive and thoughtful writing.  Drew