Snow Buntings, Crow Point and the Fuji XPro 1

A few Snow Buntings have made the onerous journey from the Arctic to Crow Point, North Devon.  Today there was a harsh frost, temperature minus four, so they may have wondered why bother?  Nevertheless a brilliant clear,  bright morning, with wraiths of mist gently rising off the River Taw and Torridge estuary and frost lying white, coating the dunes with tiny ice crystals.  Then typical of this Biosphere in a few moments,  a sharp,  freezing wind kicked up and the landscape changed from blue to grey as a heavy mist rolled in from the sea.  The surf, at low tide, some half a mile away.. invisible, yet still heard,  loud, Atlantic waves, at least ten degrees warmer than the air, the cause of this pea souper. Out of the gloom, random and abstract, a runner, miles from any where..

 

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Then we saw the Snow Buntings, squat, fat little creatures, hunched against the cold, feeding on frozen seed heads in the short Burrows grass. Flitting suddenly to another station, a flash of white and they are gone.

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Back to my Fuji roots: coast and landscape

Overlooking the wild Atlantic coast it is never easy to forget the savage beauty of the ocean or the calm sunset of a still day.

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For a while I have been focussing on other photography projects but this evening I slung the lovely old Fuji Xpro 1 over my shoulder with XF18mm attached and set off along the sand.  Dusk comes slowly here in North Devon.  The light hangs in the air,  there is a glow,  cast from the sand and the sea, reflections of gold and blue.  Today not a cloud in the sky, a faint mist already drifting across the sand-hills,  everything calm. Around me feeding on the shoreline, Oystercatchers and Egrets, Sandpipers and Sanderlings. The haunting cry of the Curlew echoes across the River Taw.  Sometimes it is awe inspiring, sometimes you have to look out and look up, how can this magic be here for me,  yet others, far away suffer oppression and tyranny?  So for today I whisper a quiet thank you.

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Fuji Jpegs versus Kodak Gold 25 years on.

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25 years ago on Sanibel Island, Florida I took some fashion images. A few days ago I caught up with the lovely model, Barley, and sugested we re-create one of the shots.  So here is is on a dull day with our U.K. yellow sand, shot with Fuji X Pro 1 and XF35 1.4 lens.  Well, I did my best but Kodak Gold sure has a great look ..

 

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Analogue versus Digital: the believe in film syndrome.

The tail end of the fifties we had the Everly Brothers, Bill Haley, Elvis and Buddy. Then the sixties. The first album I ever bought was the Rolling Stones, then the Animals. I loved jazz, and Ray Charles and Dave Brubeck. I loved Dusty and Dylan, then I loved Joni and James Taylor. I saw Neil Young play Wembley and I saw Jethro Tull, Deep Purple and Yes. Never saw Bowie or Nina Simone much to my chagrin. Yep, I dug Punk and John Peel too, Oh, and Peggy Lee and Soul and Blues.  I photographed a girl sitting in sunlight and later, married her.

Stay with me .. You will soon understand where this is going..

Girl sitting in sunlight

During the early seventies I worked in a very posh hifi shop. Our sole aim was to perfect the sound experience. Customers spent literally thousands of pounds searching for high fidelity, the best deck, the least hum and hiss the best suppression, the biggest woofer, or the lightest stylus. We craved this impossible perfection, dreamed music, had albums lining our walls, dusted them lovingly wiped them clean, double wrapped them when putting them away, played them and cursed the crackle and pop of analogue recordings, compared tape and stereo, dolby and four way sound.

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We loathed cassettes but played them in our cars because although they sounded crap compared to 8 track they were smaller and worked better. Anyway my 8 track caught fire in my Ford Cortina mk 2.

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Through the Seventies we surfed and danced and traveled a little. I forget the Eighties, think music was boring,  anyway,  my family was growing up.

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The nineties brought cd,s blimey, they were neat.  They sounded tinny compared to my old albums and not so warm, but they didn’t scratch much. Anyway what is hifi when you listen to music in the kitchen? Screw it , I embraced digital, chucked out my Yashica slr, downloaded or ripped all my albums to mp3 bunged them on an ipod and never looked back..

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And so with photography. This nostalgia for film is reciprocated in the resurgence of pressed plastic albums. Maybe I am being controversial but can’t we now re-create digitally pretty much every film emulsion ever used.? Every Photographic web site or blog I follow and there are loads of them , is offering realistic film simulations or analogue looking presets.  Some of the images here were taken years ago and some taken yesterday, with one or other of my Fuji X series cameras.  Without cheating and looking at the Exif data,  can you tell?

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All social media offer their own brand of clever filters that add grain and scratches to age the image. One of the reasons I Stick with FujiFilm is because their filmic jpgs look so great. Sure, like so many of you, I developed and printed my own negatives, burned, cropped, cut, pushed and experimented, in fact just like I do now in Lightroom. But when I contemplate this wonderful digital world we live in, I don’t really get that we view the images we say we love made on film with obsolete ( yet still fabulous ) cameras, on a screen! This means the image has been scanned, ok so it might look like an analogue photo. But essentially it has been rendered into binary code, like everything else we see online on our Macs and PCs.

I still love music, I still love my wife.

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I still love photography and still believe in film.  But I do love digital too!

Coastal photography with the Fuji XF 35mm

Any one who follows any of the Gallery Le Fey sites will know that for the most part I photograph coastal landscape scenes.  Not always, given the contrasting tones of sea,  sky and sand, as simple as it sounds.

Godrevy Light through sea thrift

Godrevy Light through sea thrift

Reflective light, blown out highlights and wide dynamic range are other pretty standard  exposure issues for the camera and photographer to overcome.  So staying in the VW Camper at Gwithian, Cornwall,  overlooking Godrevy beach, probably one of the top ten best beaches in the world,  was a great place to try out the FujiFilm XF 35. mm lens.   The light in Cornwall is extraordinary.  On the North coast the sea is a translucent blue green colour, with crashing pure white surf. The sand very light and yellow.  The sky on clear days is really bright and even when overcast or stormy there is an elegance to the coastal scene that is hard to describe or resist.

St. Ives from Gwithian

St. Ives from Gwithian

Normally a 35mm lens would not be a great choice for these sort of landscapes but the Fuji XF seemed to handle the light and tones perfectly.  Even at 9.0 a.m the light was harsh and bright so I used a polarising filter which I reckon gave me a stop or two advantage.

Rocks and pool

Rocks and pool

I mostly shot at f5.6 or f8 at 200 ISO and let shutter speed take care of itself.  This lens is incredible. On the Fuji XE2 it is neat and well balanced, it just works with no fuss and gives, in my view, perfect rendering of tones and contrast.

pool and rocks

pool and rocks